PrevPrev Go to previous topic
NextNext Go to next topic
Last Post 4/6/2011 9:03 PM by  Greg Moeller
DME vs SQL?
 9 Replies
Sort:
You are not authorized to post a reply.
Author Messages
George Graham
Senior Consultant
G&G Solutions, Inc.
Veteran Member
(465 points)
Veteran Member
Posts:201


Send Message:

--
3/10/2011 2:56 PM
    Just curious about opinions. Given that you have access to use JDBC data source....DME vs SQL? Why?
    JeffR
    Private
    Private
    Advanced Member
    (66 points)
    Advanced Member
    Posts:22


    Send Message:

    --
    3/10/2011 3:16 PM
    Our two developers that work with SmartNotes prefer SQL over DME, primarily because they are more comfortable with SQL and some queries require things that the DME can't handle such as relationships to tables that Lawson doesn't have built internally.
    John Henley
    Private
    Private
    Senior Member
    (9908 points)
    Senior Member
    Posts:3320


    Send Message:

    --
    3/10/2011 3:22 PM
    DME honors Lawson security and knows how tables are related, so it is easier to implement for simple queries. SQL has more complex capabilities, is harder to install/configure but offers better speed (although that can be debated since it ultimately is reduced to javascript variables and shouldn't be used for large datasets) and more control. =
    Thanks for using the LawsonGuru.com forums!
    John
    George Graham
    Senior Consultant
    G&G Solutions, Inc.
    Veteran Member
    (465 points)
    Veteran Member
    Posts:201


    Send Message:

    --
    3/10/2011 3:24 PM

    Personally, I think SQL is better because generally at some point data is needed that DME can't do so standardizing on an approach seems better to me than having a mixed environment.

    So let me rephrase the question slightly: Given the ability to use both options, other than having to use credentials in the data source that limit access (thus, DME), any reason to ever use DME, other than it may be a comfort level issue?
    Tim
    Programmer Analyst
    JRS
    Basic Member
    (28 points)
    Basic Member
    Posts:12


    Send Message:

    --
    3/10/2011 3:38 PM
    I prefer SQL.  It is faster and much more flexible.

    Tim
    Dean Rochester
    Advanced Member
    (76 points)
    Advanced Member
    Posts:32


    Send Message:

    --
    3/10/2011 3:51 PM
    DME can be slower to return data than SQL. DME does conform to Lawson's security. SQL is much more flexible and in LBI you can make a report using the COMMAND option and put your SQL in that command then based on permissions in LBI, you can give security to that report. I prefer SQL, I am a developer/programmer/dba
    Chris Martin
    Private
    Private
    Veteran Member
    (825 points)
    Veteran Member
    Posts:277


    Send Message:

    --
    3/10/2011 3:54 PM
    DME is a good adhoc tool for power users. Limitations are performance and flexibility (join limitations). I use sql for everything else.
    Ruma Malhotra
    Private
    Private
    Veteran Member
    (1092 points)
    Veteran Member
    Posts:412


    Send Message:

    --
    3/10/2011 8:24 PM
    The only reason to ever use DME is because it gives the values of derived fields or fields that are not present in a database when you use SQL. The most common examples if you ever have to write queries based on statuses like invoice status, check status etc.
    mark.cook
    Private
    Private
    Veteran Member
    (1244 points)
    Veteran Member
    Posts:444


    Send Message:

    --
    3/11/2011 12:38 PM
    I think it comes down to your comfort level and what you are trying to accomplish.

    Because Smartnotes are not running on demand, speed is less of an issue than with reporting services.

    For us, we have been in process of rolling LBI in a development environment out to our super users. Because they are less proficient at times with SQL, the DME works well for them, has the related tables, derived fields,etc that make it easier overall. For the IT staff, it just depends on complexity and comfort which is used.
    Greg Moeller
    Private
    Private
    Veteran Member
    (4141 points)
    Veteran Member
    Posts:1479


    Send Message:

    --
    4/6/2011 9:03 PM
    To expand on your post, Ruma. You should be familiar with one of the Lawson command-line tools- derfldrpt
    This will show you the derived fields and how they have been calculated - then you can calculate or insert them in your SQL just the way that Lawson came up with them.

    Run derfldrpt to get the syntax. You can run the tool from a script to produce a text file.. and put it as a link from your PowerUsers dashboard like we do here. Then anytime we do updates, we just run the script again to update any new derived fields.
    You are not authorized to post a reply.